Some scary folks are fabulous!

 

Not all scary looking people are scary. Who are they. These rugged intimidating folks are bikers and belong to the organisation, Bikers Against Child Abuse (B.A.C.A.). The group protects children in abusive situations.

For children/women of abuse people like the ones in the picture are a godsend. For the victim, sometimes a little courage and support from someone on the outside, stops the process of abuse.

Most of the time, outsiders, neighbours, relatives etc think – its a personal matter, why interfere ? THIS thinking is what needs to be rethought. Its not a personal matter when some man or woman beats or tortures his or her family members. You supporting or standing up for the victim may not, at that point, do any good. But sometimes this in itself can trigger a self preservation mode in the victim and the victim gets divine courage to fight back.

So if you are in the vicinity of someone getting slapped around, don’t walk away, don’t close your door, don’t say its not your problem. Even the slightest of support can save someone’s life. (Picture Source : bacaworld.org)

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Supporting girls playing sports

Eksaath Foundation raised Rs 14,000 to buy sports wear for school girls who play sports. We closed this initiative in March 2017. The girls come from low income background and for them playing sports is something pretty amazing. This was possible due to our wonderful donors – MV Priyank, Parvin Kaur Latamba and Kevin Dasilva. The need was to enable the girls to wear something formal when they went to compete. And they can do this because of our three donors. Thank you so much. And thanks to the principle Veena ji for putting this all together.

If you wish to support our initiative to empower girls, please contact us.

Awareness session with 3rd year BMS Students

A session on dealing with violence, with third year students of management. It was a 2.5 hr program on managing violence and how to respond to it, should it enter the girls life. Most girls have this preconceived notion of what violence looks like.

It’s there in text book and papers etc but to actually put it in words as to how it looks and feels is a whole different ball game. Not a very easy place to go to.

The only way we can save our girls, our women is when you free them from being victims. Free them from feeling shame. Violence is the most insidious thing and it takes even the greatest and most accomplished woman, easily down. #EksaathFoundation

If you wish to hold a program at your school or college or company, please contact us.

Donated clothing for young women at an Girls Orphanage

We donated clothing for young women between 15-19 years at an all girls Orphanage. Thank you to our donor Mrs Hanita Ravindra Shenoy.

Eksaath is working on more such ideas that can support girls at school. And trying to raise more clothing and other consumables. If you have any ideas or wish to donate, please contact us.

 

Donated clothes for 2-4 year old kids in Balwadi

Eksaath Foundation donated a 3 year old girls clothing to a Balwadi in a low income school. Thank you to our 3 year old donor Ms Mehr Ravindra Shenoy.

Eksaath is working on more such ideas that can support girls at school. And trying to raise more clothing and other consumables. If you have any ideas or wish to donate, please contact us.

Mothers are culpable for the violence of her sons.

How does domestic violence continue in a home really? In families where the husband is open with his hands and mouth and thinks it’s Ok to use them inappropriately because it’s his right to do so, how does one contain it? Is the husband only to be blamed? No.

Yes, he is the directly culpable for the violence. But his mother, is indirectly culpable too. In fact in many many cases, mother-in-laws, would perhaps egg the son on – dikha de usse ke mard kaun hai. laga de ek chanta, theek ho jayegi. (Show her who the man is, give her a slap and she will be alright)

Violence does not happen in a silo. It sometimes happens with tacit permission from family members. Remember this. If you are an in-law, and you say, when your son beats his wife, it’s a private matter between them, you are directly supporting the violence. Infact, you are telling your son, it’s Ok to beat his wife. And children too, if he beats them too.

As parents, its your birthright, to take a stick to your son when he does something wrong. Use it. You will save not only your daughter-in-law’s life, but your grand children’s lives and their future families, your daughter in law’s parent’s lives, her family and family’s family.

By using the stick, you will end up saving many many people. Use the stick. Perhaps, it would be 20 years too late, but intervene and tell your son, ‘Do not raise your hands on your wife. you wish to vent your anger, talk civilly. Do not raise your hands.’

Is this a just expectation? Yes. But will it happen? Not unless, families and society address the senior women in the homes where violence happens too. But the other side of the coin is, many of the older women, have taken the hit too. Violence sometimes then comes naturally to her children too. It’s a vicious cycle, that can be broken only by continuous engagement with the women, to break that cycle – to see the light.